Considering a Fertility Specialist?

If you’ve been trying to have a baby, consulting a fertility specialist – a Reproductive Endocrinologist – can help you take action.

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If you’ve been trying to get pregnant for one year, or if you’re over 35 years old and have been trying for six months, a fertility specialist – a Reproductive Endocrinologist – is uniquely trained to identify why you’re having trouble and provide treatment options. We’ve collected a helpful list of doctors so you can find a Reproductive Endocrinologist near you.

“What is a Reproductive Endocrinologist?”

Women who are trying to conceive are encouraged to consider a Reproductive Endocrinologist if any of the following is applicable:

  • If you've not conceived after a year of unprotected intercourse, or after six months if age 35 or older, so as not to delay potentially needed treatment
  • Irregular or absent periods
  • Two or more miscarriages
  • Prior use of an intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Endometriosis/painful menstruation
  • Breast discharge
  • Excessive acne or hirsutism (male-pattern hair growth in women)
  • Prior use of contraceptive and no subsequent menstruation
  • History of sexually transmitted disease
  • History of pelvic/genital infection
  • Previous pelvic surgery
  • Reversal of surgical sterilization
  • Chronic medical condition (e.g., diabetes, high blood pressure)
  • History of chemotherapy or radiation therapy

Men struggling with infertility are encouraged to consider a Reproductive Endocrinologist if any of the following is applicable:

  • History of sexually transmitted disease
  • History of pelvic/genital infection
  • Previous abdominal surgery
  • Reversal of surgical sterilization
  • Chronic medical condition (e.g., diabetes, high blood pressure)
  • History of chemotherapy or radiation therapy
  • Mumps after puberty
  • Previous urologic surgery
  • Prostate infection

If you have insurance, it depends on your coverage. Give us a call on 1-866-LETS-TRY and we can help you determine the necessary prerequisites for your policy for free.

If you do not have insurance, you don't need a referral. Simply find a fertility specialist near you and make an appointment.

Your first visit with your Reproductive Endocrinologist will likely be a combination of discussion and examination.

The visit will probably begin with a discussion about:

  • Medical history, including family medical history
  • Diet and lifestyle
  • Current sexual practices

Your Reproductive Endocrinologist will then examine you, and may have recommendations for your partner. These exams may consist of:

  • A general physical exam
  • A comprehensive pelvic and genital exam
  • A breast exam and routine Pap test
  • Ultrasounds to determine the thickness of the lining of the uterus (endometrium), to monitor follicle development, and to check the condition of the uterus and ovaries

After this initial visit, you’ll receive a date for a follow-up appointment, during which your doctor will review test results with you. At that point, you may either move forward with more testing or your healthcare professional may recommend a fertility treatment plan.

After reviewing results from this initial visit, your Reproductive Endocrinologist may want to proceed with future testing, which could include any of the following:33

  • Ultrasound
  • Cervical mucus test
  • Endometrial biopsy
  • Hormone levels testing
  • Laparoscopy 
  • Other tests your doctor recommends

Your fertility specialist will discuss what best suits your unique circumstances.

Ideally, start tracking your ovulation through fertility awareness or a fertility monitor. This will provide your reproductive specialists with valuable information about your ovulation. Usually one of the first questions regarding female fertility is whether you’re ovulating or not.

The sooner you take action, the sooner your fertility problem may be diagnosed and treated.


Don’t Forget to Ask…

Connecting with a Reproductive Endocrinologist is crucial, but the first visit can feel a little overwhelming. Be better prepared for your first visit by bringing along our “Questions for the Doctor” checklist.

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APA, Female Fertility Testing, 2016