Myths v Truths

Understanding the terminology and debunking common myths is an empowering step.

Myth
Couples should have sex only during ovulation.
Truth
The highest pregnancy rates are seen when a couple has intercourse every 1-2 days during the fertile window – the time in a cycle when pregnancy can occur – with no prolonged abstinence periods in between fertile cycles.6
Myth
After ejaculation, women should lie prostrate for around five minutes to help deliver sperm to the uterus.
Truth
Sperm ejaculated or released into the vagina reach the fallopian tubes within minutes regardless of position during intercourse. There is no evidence that sexual position, orgasm, or prolonged rest after intercourse increases the chance of conception.7
Myth
No lubricant should be used during sex if there are infertility issues.
Truth
Most lubricants and saliva can negatively impact the vaginal environment and should be avoided. However, there are fertility-friendly lubricants that aim to maintain the natural PH balance, and mineral oil or canola oil can be used.6 Consult your doctor about your lubrication choices.
Myth
Women ovulate on the 14th day of their cycle.
Truth
Every woman’s cycle is different. The American Pregnancy Association estimates that ovulation occurs anywhere between 11-21 days after the first day of your last menstrual period, or 12-16 days from when you expect the next menstrual period to start.8
Myth
Fertility is generally not covered by insurance.
Truth
Coverage will depend entirely on your policy. Some states have a law requiring insurance coverage for fertility treatments, also known as an insurance mandate, though there are some exceptions. To see how thorough insurance coverage generally is in your state, visit the website of our partner, RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association.
Myth
Insurance can change coverage during treatment, leaving you on the hook with high costs.
Truth
As early as possible, it is important to lock in your coverage specifications through pre-authorizations of benefits and drug coverage. You can handle securing authorization from insurance through these forms, or if you would like a little extra guidance, feel free to call 1-866-LETS-TRY.

Myth
An OBGYN is always the best first appointment for a woman struggling with infertility.

Truth
If you’re struggling with infertility, the best first step might be to see a Reproductive Endocrinologist because a Reproductive Endocrinologist – a fertility specialist – is an OBGYN with extra training in infertility issues. In addition to completing the rigorous education and experiential training for the OBGYN medical path, fertility specialists will continue their education and training specifically in the field of reproductive endocrinology and infertility. In most cases, this requires an additional three years of intensive and highly focused training.9


Myth
A urologist is the only specialist who can determine if there is male factor infertility.

Truth
For couples, a Reproductive Endocrinologist may be the best first appointment because a Reproductive Endocrinologist can treat both partners, with a more inclusive, holistic approach. If a urologist is needed, the Reproductive Endocrinologist will let that be known. Some reproductive endocrinology offices have a urologist on staff.

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Any Questions for the Doctor?

8

American Pregnancy Association, Ovulation FAQ, Accessed July 2016

9

Reproductive Resource Center, The Difference Between a Fertility Specialist and the OB/GYNAccessed July 2016